Pre and Post Show Activities

PRE AND POST-SHOW CLASSROOM-BASED ACTIVITIES

In WICKED, you’ll discover why two sorcery students came to be called ‘good’ and ‘wicked’.

WICKED, the award-winning stage musical that tells the untold story of the Witches of Oz, has inspired and engaged thousands of students with its story of friendships, choices, values and consequences.

Before seeing the show, why not read L. Frank Baum’s original story, ‘The Wonderful Wizard of Oz’ (now commonly published under the title ‘The Wizard of Oz’), and/or watch the classic MGM film adaptation?

After seeing WICKED, you can discuss how the various versions differ and how one of the most iconic and terrifying villains in literary and film history has been redefined and reclaimed as maligned and misunderstood and is now the heroine of the story.

Are people born wicked or do they have wickedness thrust upon them…?

 ‘The Wonderful Wizard of Oz’ presents a narrative that adheres to a conservative view of evil as clear-cut, with the traditional ‘fairy tale’ ending (evil is defeated), whereas Gregory Maguire’s novel observes the more progressive notion that evil is complicated and not everything is as it seems.

Is Elphaba, the lead character who later becomes known as the ‘Wicked Witch’, really wicked or simply the innocent victim of a corrupt regime?

READ THE INTRODUCTORY PACK HERE TO DISCOVER THE PLOT AND CHARACTERS FURTHER DISCUSSION TOPICS AND ACTIVITIES

Depending on Key Stages, you can set post-show written or drawing assignments based around:

Older: Key Stage 3+

 Impressions of, and differences in, the stories.
How good and evil are portrayed in each.
The issues, challenges and dilemmas faced by the characters.
The consequences the character’s behaviour and actions have on themselves and others.
How propaganda and rumour (and so called “fake news”) are used to condemn Elphaba as ‘wicked’.
Which character that made the most lasting impression on you and why?
Which character did you most identify with?

See more writing task from our Wicked Young Writer Awards resources here:

Younger: Key Stage 2 and 3

Character- role on the wall activity
Writing letters to a character
Writing a diary entry of a character
Writing and performing a news report
Character poses
Writing a spell
Making up new ‘Wicked’ words.
See more in our Primary Pack here

Please note: Gregory Maguire’s ‘Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West’ is recommended for readers aged 16+ only.